Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PLUSES

Life must be studied not from the pluses alone, but from the minuses too.

Only the most expert examiner should limit his record to pluses and minuses.

Peace cannot be reached by the simple addition of pluses and elimination of minuses from life.

WORD ORIGIN

1570s, the oral rendering of the arithmetical sign +, from Latin plus "more, in greater number, more often" (comparative of multus "much"), altered (by influence of minus) from *pleos, from PIE *pele- (1) "to fill" (see poly-).

As a preposition, between two numbers to indicate addition, from 1660s. [Barnhart writes that this sense "did not exist in Latin and probably originated in commercial language of the Middle Ages."] Placed after a whole number to indicate "and a little more," it is attested from 1902. As a conjunction, "and," it is American English colloquial, attested from 1968. As a noun meaning "an advantage" from 1791. Plus fours (1921) were four inches longer in the leg than standard knickerbockers, to produce an overhang, originally a style associated with golfers. The plus sign itself has been well-known since at least late 15c. and is perhaps an abbreviation of Latin et (see et cetera).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PLUSES

capital goods

nounmaterials used in the production of goods
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.