Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PLOW UNDER

Green crops, to plow under, are in many places largely raised, and are always beneficial.

The cotton is grown for market, the corn partly to sell, partly to feed, the oats to feed and the cowpeas to plow under.

It makes a good growth during the fall and early winter and is in blossom and ready to cut or plow under in April or May.

In the spring plow it under, and you plow under all the nitrogen that the plants had collected the previous year.

You don't get quite the same benefit from the green manure when you pasture as when you plow under.

WORD ORIGIN

late Old English plog, ploh "plow; plowland" (a measure of land equal to what a yoke of oxen could plow in a day), possibly from a Scandinavian source (cf. Old Norse plogr "plow," Swedish and Danish plog), from Proto-Germanic *plogo- (cf. Old Saxon plog, Old Frisian ploch "plow," Middle Low German ploch, Middle Dutch ploech, Dutch ploeg, Old High German pfluog, German Pflug), a late word in Germanic, of uncertain origin. Old Church Slavonic plugu, Lithuanian plugas "plow" are Germanic loan-words, as probably is Latin plovus, plovum "plow," a word said by Pliny to be of Rhaetian origin.

Replaced Old English sulh, cognate with Latin sulcus "furrow." As a name for the star pattern also known as the Big Dipper or Charles's Wain, it is attested by early 15c., perhaps early 14c. The three "handle" stars (in the Dipper configuration) generally are seen as the team of oxen pulling the plow, though sometimes they are the handle.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PLOW UNDER

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.