Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PITIED

She pitied herself,—that lowest ebb of melancholy self-consciousness.

She is to be pitied—she cannot either like or dislike with temper!

The men I had to deal with were more to be pitied than blamed.

It's us that's left behind that's to be pitied, not them that goes.

I pitied him; I owed him hospitality; but it seemed intolerable that he should be there.

They did not harm her, for they saw that she was sick; they pitied her—some loved her.

"She is certainly to be pitied, but also to be blamed," said Mr. Percival.

The man who pitied me spoke, so far as I was concerned, the language of thieves.

I pitied the Germans for having embarked on such an adventure.

He looked at Harkless, and pitied him with an almost tearful compassion.

WORD ORIGIN

early 13c., from Old French pite, pitet "pity, mercy, compassion, care, tenderness; pitiful state, wretched condition" (11c., Modern French pitié), from Latin pietatem (nominative pietas) "piety, loyalty, duty" (see piety). Replaced Old English mildheortness, literally "mild-heartness," itself a loan-translation of Latin misericordia. English pity and piety were not fully distinguished until 17c. Transferred sense of "grounds or cause for pity" is from late 14c.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.