Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PACKING UP

I set about packing up for the journey, whither, I knew not.

So there is nothing now but packing up sofas, and pictures, and so on.

Maud faltered something about packing up; pain in her eye; not her fault.

I am so busy in packing up my goods that I have no time to talk with thee any longer.

The servants in the palace were packing up what they could for so hurried a removal.

As for packing up a dog, that is impossible; the best way is to pack it off.

Nonsense; you lent it to me last night when I was packing up our things.

And now you must think of packing up, and be off at dawn with the rest.

It is just packing up their Gladstone bag, and off they go, as happy as you please.

One was packing up to go somewhere; one was told "the landlord wanted her."

WORD ORIGIN

"bundle," early 13c., probably from a Low German word (cf. Middle Dutch pac, pack "bundle," Middle Low German pak, Middle Flemish pac, attested from late 12c.), originally a term of wool traders in Flanders; or possibly from Old Norse pakki. All are of unknown origin.

Italian pacco is a Dutch loan word; French pacque probably is from Flemish. Meaning "set of persons" (usually of a low character) is c.1300, older than sense of "group of hunting animals" (early 15c.). Extended to collective sets of playing cards (1590s), floating ice (1791), cigarettes (1924), and submarines (1943). Meaning "knapsack on a frame" is attested from 1916. Pack of lies first attested 1763.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.