Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR OTHERS

Some of these bright beings are speaking, and others are silent.

The haughtiness of others can never make us angry, if we ourselves are humble.

She was little concerned with the morality of her course as others might appraise it.

They were apart from the others and for the moment unnoticed.

In the distance they could see the others following ghostly lamps.

Others not less popular had to do with the reasons for the slump.

The Phoenicians who were not interested in piety succeeded where the others had failed.

They gave him a title which distinguished him from the others.

This assurance satisfied the others, but it did not satisfy Harriet.

There are others, perhaps, who have not been fully sensible of the privileges which they enjoyed.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English oþer "the second" (adj.), also as a pronoun, "one of the two, other," from Proto-Germanic *antharaz (cf. Old Saxon athar, Old Frisian other, Old Norse annarr, Middle Dutch and Dutch ander, Old High German andar, German ander, Gothic anþar "other").

These are from PIE *an-tero-, variant of *al-tero- "the other of two" (cf. Lithuanian antras, Sanskrit antarah "other, foreign," Latin alter), from root *al- "beyond" (see alias) + adjectival comparative suffix *-tero-. The Old English, Old Saxon, and Old Frisian forms show "a normal loss of n before fricatives" [Barnhart]. Meaning "different" is mid-13c.

Sense of "second" was detached from this word in English (which uses second, from Latin) and German (zweiter, from zwei "two") to avoid ambiguity. In Scandinavian, however, the second floor is still the "other" floor (e.g. Swedish andra, Danish anden). Also cf. Old English oþergeara "next year."

The other woman "a woman with whom a man begins a love affair while he is already committed" is from 1855. The other day originally (mid-12c.) was "the next day;" later (c.1300) "yesterday;" and now, loosely, "a day or two ago" (early 15c.). Phrase other half in reference to either the poor or the rich, is recorded from c.1600.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR OTHERS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.