Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR OBLIVION

His own public had unjustly neglected him, posterity consigned his operas to oblivion.

Thenceforth, all these royal souvenirs had passed into oblivion.

And do not cast in oblivion that at the last I obeyed your wish and brought you safely to Riolama.

And am I to be hurried along by this stream of corruption to infamy and oblivion!

But, Mr. Darnay, oblivion is not so easy to me, as you represent it to be to you.

We sank into oblivion until the calling-bell brought us to our feet.

The solemn stilness of the scene for a moment hushed the sorrows of Edwin into oblivion.

The alarms and glories of the struggle with Napoleon buried it in oblivion.

But he could show nothing of the kind, and his hypothesis has pretty well dropped into oblivion, as it deserved to do.

The words were, "Oblivion of injuries; pardon for offences."

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "state or fact of forgetting," from Old French oblivion (13c.) and directly from Latin oblivionem (nominative oblivio) "forgetfulness; a being forgotten," from oblivisci (past participle oblitus) "forget," originally "even out, smooth over, efface," from ob "over" (see ob-) + root of levis "smooth," from PIE *lei-w-, from root *(s)lei- "slime, slimy, sticky" (see slime (n.)). Meaning "state of being forgotten" is early 15c.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR OBLIVION

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.