Antonyms for naming

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR NAMING

Flower-of-the-Maguey, she was called, and she was beautiful beyond all naming.

If it were so much,” said he, naming a smaller sum, “I could do it.

Naming him was a portentous proceeding and one not to be lightly gone about.

"To the hereafter," says he, naming the station at the end of the route.

That definition requires that the Manxman had no hand in naming Man.

Then she led me to the table, and presented me to the company, naming each to me.

And then, again, in No. 2, his thoughts on naming country houses.

The colonel was naming the houses as they passed, with good old names.

There is some intention, I understand, of naming me as the Nuncio at Florence.

He had long been desirous,” he said, “of naming a child after his dear old friend, Dr. Green.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English nama, noma "name, reputation," from Proto-Germanic *namon (cf. Old Saxon namo, Old Frisian nama, Old High German namo, German Name, Middle Dutch name, Dutch naam, Old Norse nafn, Gothic namo "name"), from PIE *nomn- (cf. Sanskrit nama; Avestan nama; Greek onoma, onyma; Latin nomen; Old Church Slavonic ime, genitive imene; Russian imya; Old Irish ainm; Old Welsh anu "name").

Meaning "famous person" is from 1610s. Meaning "one's reputation" is from c.1300. As a modifier meaning "well-known," first attested 1938. Name brand is from 1944; name-calling attested from 1846; name-dropper first recorded 1947. name-tag is from 1903; name-child attested from 1845. The name of the game "the essential thing or quality" is from 1966; to have one's name in lights "be a famous performer" is from 1929.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR NAMING

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.