Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MORE DECENT

The more decent, sensible men are not always the best talkers.

If you want me to stay you had better be more decent to me, Martin.

But to have more decent people in the world—he sacrificed everything to that.

But I do love you and—and I shall try and be more decent to people.

Their behaviour was more decent than usual on such occasions.

I must get you a more decent dress at once, and some breakfast.

The more decent he is, the greater the number of such things in his mind.

It will at least provide you with a more decent coat and wig than those you're wearing.

So bad were they, indeed, that I had to ask the local authority of Sung-kan whether he could not find me more decent quarters.

No,” answered the gentleman, “such a remark can never be made; and it must be more decent to make no alteration in dress.

WORD ORIGIN

1530s, "proper to one's station or rank," also "tasteful," from Middle French décent, or directly from Latin decentem (nominative decens) "becoming, seemly, fitting, proper," present participle of decere "to be fitting or suitable," from PIE *deke-, from root *dek- "to take, accept, to receive, greet, be suitable" (cf. Greek dokein "to appear, seem, think," dekhesthai "to accept;" Sanskrit daśasyati "shows honor, is gracious," dacati "makes offerings, bestows;" Latin docere "to teach," decus "grace, ornament"). Meaning "kind, pleasant" is from 1902. Are you decent? (1949) was originally backstage theater jargon for "are you dressed."

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.