mildew

[ mil-doo, -dyoo ]SEE DEFINITION OF mildew

Synonyms for mildew

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MILDEW

The very spectacle of that form which I had learned to love is mildew and contagion to my eyes.

Of these, mealy-bug, red-spider, thrips and mildew are most troublesome.

The only fungous disease of the grape troublesome in the greenhouse is mildew.

The vine is vigorous, hardy and productive but subject to mildew and rot.

The vine is vigorous, hardy and productive but susceptible to mildew.

And I've had to turn everything out of every shelf in the house, for mildew and moths.

Every spot of mildew on the ancient wall-paper was familiar.

Pale patches on the leaves are caused by mildew and are a sign of decay.

It is no pleasure to me to enter this house, and ruin and mildew everything I touch.

If it be mildew, the specimen must come out of the case and be properly dried.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-13c., mildeu "honeydew, nectar," from Old English meledeaw "honeydew" (sticky stuff exuded by aphids), from Proto-Germanic compound of *melith "honey" (see Melissa) + *dawwaz "dew" (see dew). Cf. Old Saxon milidou, Dutch meeldauw, German Meltau "mildew."

First element in many cases assimilated to forms of meal (n.2) "ground grain." As a kind of fungus it is first recorded mid-14c., so called from its being sticky and originally growing in plants. As a verb from 1550s. Related: Mildewed.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MILDEW

blight

noundisease; plague
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.