meridian

[ muh-rid-ee-uh n ]SEE DEFINITION OF meridian

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MERIDIAN

By meridian altitudes of sun, Lyrae (Vega), 32 degrees 15 minutes.

By meridian altitude of sun, camp is in latitude 31 degrees 53 minutes South.

Following is the revised edition of the Decalogue, calculated for this meridian.

Before he reached it the golden sun had begun to decline from his meridian height.

The profuseness of the illuminations outdid the brightness of the meridian sun.

In the French version, it is the 170th meridian, which is clearly wrong.

The Ward and Lock translation changes it to the 117th meridian.

On the 60th day out the meridian of Greenwich was crossed in lat.

Yes, but the meridian of the Palais-Royal is the most exact.

The sun, she showed, was long past the meridian and was on its return.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-14c., "noon," from Old French meridien "of the noon time, midday; the Meridian; southerner" (12c.), and directly from Latin meridianus "of midday, of noon, southerly, to the south," from meridies "noon, south," from meridie "at noon," altered by dissimilation from pre-Latin *medi die, locative of medius "mid-" (see medial (adj.)) + dies "day" (see diurnal). Cartographic sense first recorded late 14c. Figurative uses tend to suggest "point of highest development or fullest power."

The city in Mississippi, U.S., was settled 1854 (as Sowashee Station) at a railway junction and given its current name in 1860, supposedly by people who thought meridian meant "junction" (they perhaps confused the word with median).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MERIDIAN

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