madrigal

[ mad-ri-guh l ]SEE DEFINITION OF madrigal
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MADRIGAL

I must needs try my new-fledged pinions in sonnet, elogy, and madrigal.

Away from Madrigal—anywhere—and at once; tomorrow at latest.

The three poets, with three lutes, were singing a madrigal in her honour.

Perhaps she would soon be down—should he write the madrigal he had promised her?

The madrigal differed from this only in dealing with secular subjects.

John Wilbye is styled by Oliphant the first of madrigal writers.

And the statement about the Burlesque Madrigal is truly absurd.

To secure his footing he offered the Academy in 1728 a Madrigal in five voices.

This was an expression of Ariosto in one of his smaller poems, I believe in a Madrigal.

To this day a madrigal and other songs of his are known to music lovers.

WORD ORIGIN

"short love poem," also "part-song for three or more voices," 1580s, from Italian madrigale, probably from Venetian dialect madregal "simple, ingenuous," from Late Latin matricalis "invented, original," literally "of or from the womb," from matrix (genitive matricis) "womb" (see matrix).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MADRIGAL

carol

nounjoyful hymn
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.