Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CHORUS

When Banstead took the chorus out to supper he had the ready repartee of his kind.

Shall I sing the chorus now or would you prefer to hear it later.

Her gasp of astonishment was lost in the chorus of congratulatory cries.

So they all called in chorus,—Fido and the other honest friends.

I know who's goin' to be there, an' set in the chorus an' sing alto.

The Berkshire tragedy had a chorus; but the London tragedy has no chorus.

But I wish that there were some way in which the chorus could enter.

As the two drew nearer the crowd a chorus of voices greeted them.

Her sister seconded her, and a chorus of approval arose from around the table.

He sings while the crew heaves on the ropes an' they all come in on the chorus.

WORD ORIGIN

1560s, from Latin chorus "a dance in a circle, the persons singing and dancing, the chorus of a tragedy," from Greek khoros "band of dancers or singers, dance, dancing ground," perhaps from PIE *gher- "to grasp, enclose," if the original sense of the Greek word is "enclosed dancing floor." Extension from dance to voice is because Attic drama arose from tales inserted in the intervals of the dance. In Attic tragedy, the khoros (of 15 or 24 persons) gave expression, between the acts, to the moral and religious sentiments evoked by the actions of the play.

Originally in English used in theatrical sense; meaning of "a choir" first attested 1650s. Meaning "the refrain of a song" (which the audience joins in singing) is 1590s. As a verb, 1703, from the noun. Chorus girl is 1894.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CHORUS

anthem

nounsong
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.