Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CHANTED

What pitched battles, worthy to be chanted in Homeric strains!

"Indeed, yes," I chanted, finding my pipe and tobacco pouch.

Very stately the Sanscrit sounded in which they chanted their adoration.

And this, chanted again and again, would have made the coldest care.

They all held up their hands, and there and then they vowed a vow and chanted the battle hymn.

The old ballads were made to be sung; or, at least, to be chanted.

A Hollander, might just as well have chanted modern Greek, or Coptic.

They chanted prayers five times every day, but they had not the faith.

Paddy, in his anguish, chanted to himself an Irish wail in which he described his unhappiness.

So he ordered the “Glory be to the Father” to be chanted in future, but he did not like it.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., from Old French chanter "to sing, celebrate" (12c.), from Latin cantare "to sing," originally frequentative of canere "sing" (which it replaced), from PIE root *kan- "to sing" (cf. Greek eikanos "cock," Old English hana "cock," both literally "bird who sings for sunrise;" Old Irish caniaid "sings," Welsh canu "sing"). The frequentative quality of the word was no longer felt in Latin, and by the time French emerged the word had entirely displaced canere. Related: Chanted; chanting.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.