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View definitions for insidiously

insidiously

adverb as in slyly

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Example Sentences

There’s a related, even more insidious concept called the glass cliff.

While anti-competitive pricing algorithms could wreak havoc, there are plenty of other arenas where collusive AI could have even more insidious effects, from military applications to healthcare and insurance.

This behind-doors transmission trend reflects pandemic fatigue and widening social bubbles, experts say — and is particularly insidious because it is so difficult to police and likely to increase as temperatures drop and holidays approach.

From Page 1, when Elle suffers the indignities of “brand-spankin’-new underwear” that make her feel like a “bear in the woods with an insidious itch,” Elle and Darcy are as recognizable and entertaining as your best friends from college.

That makes 21st century crypto-fascism all the more insidious and harder to identify.

Real understanding and actual truth accumulate more insidiously.

The cellphone use among pedestrians has dovetailed insidiously with hyper-gentrification, Moss says.

Others, more quietly but just as insidiously, operate from the Muslim religious right.

If it so happens that you can insidiously mould a new party meanwhile, so much the better.

Suppose I insidiously work up a reform movement in this State, and am shot into Congress over the head of the machine?

How insidiously these efforts are being made we shall see in the next chapter.

Oh yes, and most insidiously, in those lines he wrote to go before Diane de Lys.

It was taking place so insidiously, so quietly, that it had attracted no great attention.

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On this page you'll find 60 synonyms, antonyms, and words related to insidiously, such as: behind closed doors, behind someone's back, by stealth, clandestinely, confidentially, and covertly.

From Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

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