inquisition

[ in-kwuh-zish-uhn, ing- ]SEE DEFINITION OF inquisition
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR INQUISITION

This stopped Larcher's inquisition, though not his curiosity.

History accuses Isabella of having established the Inquisition in Spain.

The inquisition at once seized their persons, and proceeded to try them for their crimes.

Miss Graham, noticing his hesitation, hastened to end the inquisition.

Even at the risk of its really bringing down the inquisition?

He got into difficulties with the Inquisition and had to leave.

Portugal fell to a Marrano physician who had escaped from the Inquisition.

He examined the chair as though it were some instrument of the Inquisition.

Perhaps at some time in his life he had read some stories of the Inquisition.

McAlpin saw he was in for it, and resigned himself to an inquisition.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "judicial investigation, act or process of inquiring," from Old French inquisicion "inquiry, investigation" (12c.), from Latin inquisitionem (nominative inquisitio) "a searching into, legal examination," noun of action from past participle stem of inquirere (see inquire).

In Church history, inquisitors were appointed from 382 C.E. to root out heretics, and the Inquisition refers to the ecclesiastical court (Congregation of the Holy Office) appointed 13c. by Innocent III to suppress heresy. It never operated in Britain. The capital letter form appeared in English only after c.1500, and usually refers to the office's reorganization 1478-1483 in Spain as what is commonly called the Spanish Inquisition.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR INQUISITION

enquiries

nouninquest
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.