Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR INN

In the light of morning the isolation of the inn is more apparent than at night.

Scene changes to an inn on the coast within a few yards of Paris.

Here was an offer which the company in an English inn at that or any other date are slow to refuse.

Better to sleep here at this inn, and then travel on to Minstead in the morning.

The oddest part of these experiences is that the dirtier the inn the better the fare.

There was the inn, there the spot where he had sat and talked with the driver.

No well-regulated Thames inn can exist a week without a bride and groom.

There was a venta or inn near by, he said, where they could sleep, starting again at dawn.

Or they might have heard rumours of his sword-play at the inn and on the ship.

And quiet—quiet to gloom, did the inn, so noisy overnight, seem by morning.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English inn "lodging, dwelling, house," probably from inne (adv.) "inside, within" (see in). Meaning "public house with lodging" is perhaps by c.1200, certainly by c.1400. Meaning "lodging house or residence for students" is early 13c. in Anglo-Latin, obsolete except in names of buildings that were so used (e.g. Inns of Court, mid-15c.).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR INN

bar

nounestablishment serving alcohol
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.