influenza

[ in-floo-en-zuh ]SEE DEFINITION OF influenza
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR INFLUENZA

The lucky alarm of an influenza decided what might not have been decided quite so soon.

"Measles—or influenza," he said, with a pursing of the lips.

The result is colds, pneumonia, influenza—eventually tuberculosis.

I was told you had influenza, or cold: but I suppose that is all over by this time.

When Jones has the influenza, Brown dutifully catches cold in the head.

The others ought to be here directly, unless they have got the influenza too.

It was from Mr. Tyler, and stated that he had caught the influenza, and could not come.

Why, at my best, the years the influenza was so bad, I never cleared a thousand net.

It was four days later that she sickened of the Spanish influenza, so called.

The maids are best in bed, and are all ill with the influenza.

WORD ORIGIN

1743, borrowed during an outbreak of the disease in Europe, from Italian influenza "influenza, epidemic," originally "visitation, influence (of the stars)," from Medieval Latin influentia (see influence). Used in Italian for diseases since at least 1504 (cf. influenza di febbre scarlattina "scarlet fever") on notion of astral or occult influence. The 1743 outbreak began in Italy. Often applied since mid-19c. to severe colds.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR INFLUENZA

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.