indented

[ verb in-dent; noun in-dent, in-dent ]SEE DEFINITION OF indented

Synonyms for indented

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR INDENTED

Sub-eroded: wing margins when somewhat, but irregularly, indented.

It is characterized by an indented coast and has a safe harbor.

"Oh, so that it shall not get indented or bruised easily," replied Marco.

But lead would be soft, and thus would easily get bruised and indented.

Indented, I confess, and labels too; But neither wax nor words.

Pages 318 and 333 had paragraphs that were not indented in the orginal.

It was heavily wooded, and indented with shallow, placid waterways.

The bank itself near the old shaft was torn, and indented with footmarks.

For the rest, it is surrounded by the sea and indented with numerous bays.

The transport and detailed equipment had to be indented for.

WORD ORIGIN

early 15c., indenten/endenten "to make notches; to give (something) a toothed or jagged appearance," also "to make a legal indenture," from Old French endenter "to notch or dent, give a serrated edge to," from Medieval Latin indentare "to furnish with teeth," from in- "into, in, on, upon" (see in- (2)) + Latin dens (genitive dentis) "tooth" (see tooth). Related: Indented; indenting. The printing sense is first attested 1670s. The noun is first recorded 1590s, from the verb. An earlier noun sense of "a written agreement" (late 15c.) is described in Middle English Dictionary as "scribal abbrev. of endenture."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR INDENTED

concave

adjectivecurved, depressed
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.