Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR HOOKER

Nor does anybody, save here and there an antiquarian, read Shepard and Hooker and Mayhew.

I do not need a bracer to get me going or a hooker to keep me under way.

Hooker's action is by far worse, and thus Hooker deserves to be shot.

Hooker, because he alone is a captain, cannot be in command.

Stanton said to me that he believes in Hooker, (p. 218) even if Hooker be unsuccessful.

If Hooker is in fault, then he ought not to survive this disaster.

Butterfield was not even with Hooker, but at Falmouth at the telegraph.

Hooker's staff was worse than sham-science, and was not even empiricism.

And this from Hooker who accused his former chiefs of that very fault.

Hooker may attack vigorously, stand as a rock, but cannot manœuvre.

WORD ORIGIN

"prostitute," often traced to the disreputable morals of the Army of the Potomac (American Civil War) under the tenure of Gen. "Fighting Joe" Hooker (early 1863), and the word might have been popularized by this association at that time (though evidence is wanting). But it is reported to have been in use in North Carolina c.1845 ("[I]f he comes by way of Norfolk he will find any number of pretty Hookers in the Brick row not far from French's hotel. Take my advice and touch nothing in the shape of a prostitute when you come through Raleigh, for in honest truth the clap is there of luxuriant growth." letter quoted in Norman E. Eliason, "Tarheel Talk," 1956).

One early theory traces it to Corlear's Hook, a section of New York City.

Perhaps related to hooker "thief, pickpocket" (1560s), but most likely a reference to prostitutes hooking or snaring clients. Hook in the figurative sense of "that by which anyone is attracted or caught" is recorded from early 15c.; and hook (v.) in the figurative sense of "catch hold of and draw in" is attested from 1570s; in reference to "fishing" for a husband or a wife, it was in common use from c.1800. All of which makes the modern sense seem a natural step. Cf. French accrocheuse, raccrocheuse, common slang term for "street-walker, prostitute," literally "hooker" of men.

The family name Hooker (attested from c.975 C.E.) would mean "maker of hooks," or else refer to an agricultural laborer who used a hook (cf. Old English weodhoc "weed-hook").

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR HOOKER

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.