Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR HENCHMAN

No henchman he worthied by weapons, if witness his features, his peerless presence!

A henchman attended, carried the carven cup in hand, served the clear mead.

At sight of them, I swung round and gripped my henchman by the shoulder.

"Wh-h—" stuttered the henchman, and then almost snatched it from Tim's hand.

For his tone was that of the great man addressing his henchman.

The Governor had dined sumptuously and received his henchman graciously.

Then how good it would be to have such a henchman as Tom at my side.

It was not the Samurai but the henchman who was weak and wrong.

And she would have to call Mrs. Henchman Mother, and Audrey would be her sister!

Would they be pleased and surprised—her grandmother and Mrs. Henchman and Audrey?

WORD ORIGIN

mid-14c., hengestman, later henshman (mid-15c.) "high-ranking servant (usually of gentle birth), attendant upon a king, nobleman, etc.," originally "groom," probably from man (n.) + Old English hengest "horse, stallion, gelding," from Proto-Germanic *hangistas (cf. Old Frisian hengst, Dutch hengest, German Hengst "stallion"), perhaps literally "best at springing," from PIE *kenku- (cf. Greek kekiein "to gush forth;" Lithuanian sokti "to jump, dance;" Breton kazek "a mare," literally "that which belongs to a stallion").

Perhaps modeled on Old Norse compound hesta-maðr "horse-boy, groom." The word became obsolete in England but was retained in Scottish as "personal attendant of a Highland chief," in which sense Scott revived it in literary English from 1810. Sense of "obedient or unscrupulous follower" is first recorded 1839, probably based on a misunderstanding of the word as used by Scott.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR HENCHMAN

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.