Synonyms for held out

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR HELD OUT

He brought forth from a pocket a neat sheaf of banknotes, which he held out.

And, when he held out his hand, smiling: "I just had to do it, Mr. K."

"It is because you are good," she said, and held out her hand.

I smiled and held out both my hands to him, and I could see him falter as he looked.

Crane faced about, and coming forward, held out his hand to the man of distrust.

She studied her an instant incredulously, then she went to her and held out her hand.

When he held out the kerchief to her, their hands, by chance, touched for a moment.

"It doesn't matter," she said when he held out his hand for it.

He straightened up and held out his hand, guiding me to a seat beside him.

But, it is due to myself, to say, I held out against it all.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English haldan (Anglian), healdan (West Saxon), "to contain, grasp; retain; foster, cherish," class VII strong verb (past tense heold, past participle healden), from Proto-Germanic *haldanan (cf. Old Saxon haldan, Old Frisian halda, Old Norse halda, Dutch houden, German halten "to hold," Gothic haldan "to tend"), originally "to keep, tend, watch over" (as cattle), later "to have." Ancestral sense is preserved in behold. The original past participle holden was replaced by held beginning 16c., but survives in some legal jargon and in beholden.

Hold back is 1530s, transitive; 1570s, intransitive; hold off is early 15c., transitive; c.1600, intransitive; hold out is 1520s as "to stretch forth," 1580s as "to resist pressure." Hold on is early 13c. as "to maintain one’s course," 1830 as "to keep one’s grip on something," 1846 as an order to wait or stop. To hold (one's) tongue "be silent" is from c.1300. To hold (one's) own is from early 14c. To hold (someone's) hand "give moral support" is from 1935. Phrase hold your horses "be patient" is from 1844. To have and to hold have been paired alliteratively since at least c.1200, originally of marriage but also of real estate.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.