Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR GUTTED

I will be safe through the day, and besides, the beast has gutted this ship.

A lot of them weren't around, any more, and their plantations were gutted ruins.

In 1742 it was gutted by fire, and was not rebuilt for some time owing to lack of funds.

After that they gutted, and some say burned the old meeting.

She felt an aching hollow as if she had been gutted like a butchered deer.

The office of the "Tribune" was raided, gutted, and set on fire.

We gutted it, taking all its stores and artillery, and then destroyed it.

They ran into the ceiling that Monroe had built across the gutted walls.

The fish who were thus content, and in their duty, had been gutted, and were in the frying-pan.

The southern portion of the village had been shelled to pieces and gutted.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English guttas (plural) "bowels, entrails," related to geotan "to pour," from PIE *gheu- "pour" (see found (v.2)). Related to Middle Dutch gote, Dutch goot, German Gosse "gutter, drain," Middle English gote "channel, stream." Meaning "abdomen, belly" is from c.1400. Meaning "easy college course" is student slang from 1916, probably from obsolete slang sense of "feast" (the connecting notion is "something that one can eat up"). Sense of "inside contents of anything" (usually plural) is from 1570s. To hate (someone's) guts is first attested 1918. The notion of the intestines as a seat of emotions is ancient (cf. bowel) and probably explains expressions such as gut reaction (1963), gut feeling (by 1970), and cf. guts. Gut check attested by 1976.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR GUTTED

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.