Synonyms for feminines

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Antonyms for feminines

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FEMININES

Do you not know that European feminines in all ranks of society—alack, even in our own!

There are no feminines or diminutives of those words, my dear.

It really seemed as if she was fitting out an army of feminines.

In Welsh—initials of feminines become light after the Articles.

Is it my fault that feminines overwhelm me with unsought affections?

The n-Declension includes (a) masculines, (b) feminines, and (c) neuters.

The Nouns themselves (to whatever class they may belong) are either masculines, feminines, or intermediates (neuter).

All ending in the invariably long vowels, H and O, and in A among the vowels that may be long, are feminines.

It is an open gate through which feminines slide into a habit of gambling.

Some of these feminines, however, have a method of retaliation which happily does not exist further north.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-14c., "of the female sex," from Old French femenin (12c.) "feminine, female; with feminine qualities, effeminate," from Latin femininus "feminine" (in the grammatical sense at first), from femina "woman, female," literally "she who suckles," from root of felare "to suck, suckle" (see fecund). Sense of "woman-like, proper to or characteristic of women" is recorded from mid-15c.

The interplay of meanings now represented in female, feminine, and effeminate, and the attempt to make them clear and separate, has led to many coinages: feminitude (1878); feminile "feminine" (1640s); feminility "womanliness" (1838); femality (17c., "effeminacy;" 1754 "female nature"). Also feminality (1640s, "quality or state of being female"), from rare adjective feminal (late 14c.), from Old French feminal. And femineity "quality or state of being feminine," from Latin femineus "of a woman, pertaining to a woman."