Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English fætt "fat, fatted, plump, obese," originally a contracted past participle of fættian "to cram, stuff," from Proto-Germanic *faitaz "fat" (cf. Old Frisian fatt, Old Norse feitr, Dutch vet, German feist), from PIE *poid- "to abound in water, milk, fat, etc." (cf. Greek piduein "to gush forth"), from root *peie- "to be fat, swell" (cf. Sanskrit payate "swells, exuberates," pituh "juice, sap, resin;" Lithuanian pienas "milk;" Greek pion "fat, wealthy;" Latin pinguis "fat").

Teen slang meaning "attractive, up to date" (also later phat) is attested from 1951. Fat cat "privileged and rich person" is from 1928; fat chance "no chance at all" attested from 1906. Fathead is from 1842; fat-witted is from 1590s; fatso is first recorded 1944. Expression the fat is in the fire originally meant "the plan has failed" (1560s).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FATLIKE

fat

adjectivecontaining an oily substance

fatter

adjectivecontaining an oily substance
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.