Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FAIREST

For we have made them the fairest offers, but they would not be persuaded.

Paris and the fairest woman in the world were well across the sea.

But the fairest she laid her comb by itsel' On the rock where the king's son lay.

But the fairest, wi' hair like the mune in a clud, She sought till she was the last.

I will not ask you, fairest of your sex, to give your confidence to unauthorised words.

Fairest, forlornest, and saddest of all the cities, and dearest!

There remains still the finest and fairest of all men and all States—tyranny and the tyrant.

That country is the fairest which is inhabited by the noblest minds.

And the body is fairest which grows up straight and well-formed from the time of birth.

Now the fairest and most useful of strains will be uttered by the elder men, and therefore we cannot let them off.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English fæger "beautiful, lovely, pleasant," from Proto-Germanic *fagraz (cf. Old Saxon fagar, Old Norse fagr, Old High German fagar "beautiful," Gothic fagrs "fit"), perhaps from PIE *pek- "to make pretty" (cf. Lithuanian puošiu "I decorate").

The meaning in reference to weather (c.1200) preserves the original sense (opposed to foul). Sense of "light-complexioned" (1550s) reflects tastes in beauty; sense of "free from bias" (mid-14c.) evolved from another early meaning, "morally pure, unblemished" (late 12c.). The sporting senses (fair ball, fair catch etc.) began in 1856. Fair play is from 1590s; fair and square is from c.1600. Fair-haired in the figurative sense of "darling, favorite" is from 1909. First record of fair-weather friends is from 1736.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.