excised

[ noun ek-sahyz, -sahys; verb ek-sahyz, ik-sahyz ]SEE DEFINITION OF excised
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR EXCISED

That is the case presented by the Dame's papers, when the incredible is excised.

If the condition has arisen, the pseudo-sac should be excised.

If discovered at once the bitten part had better be excised.

I have excised all you proposed and more on my own movement.

His wound was excised, "spirit bipped," dressed and bandaged.

The wound was excised, but the surgeon said: "I'm afraid he's done for, poor fellow."

In almost every other country in Europe they are excised, more or less.

In the employment of “paring and pricking,” a thin shaving of bark was excised on one occasion.

At the next tapping no bark was excised, but a pricking instrument was used along the previously cut surface.

The ball, together with a piece of cloth, was excised in front, two inches above and internal to the fold of the axilla.

WORD ORIGIN

"tax on goods," late 15c., from Middle Dutch excijs (early 15c.), apparently altered from accijs "tax" (by influence of Latin excisus "cut out or removed," see excise (v.)), traditionally from Old French acceis "tax, assessment" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *accensum, ultimately from Latin ad- "to" (see ad-) + census "tax, census" (see census). English got the word, and the idea for the tax, from Holland.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR EXCISED

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.