entail

[ verb en-teyl; noun en-teyl, en-teyl ]SEE DEFINITION OF entail
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ENTAIL

There, by their law of entail, the same process is unswifter,—yet does it unvary.

You shall answer to me for that word, though it entail a yet worse dishonour to meet you.

As the price of it he was fully prepared for the sacrifice of his own life, which it must entail.

If that does not entail simony and sacrilege, then such things do not exist at all.

Who could have thought that the law of entail could sway a mother's affections?

I don't believe you can charge your estate against the entail.

No man's executorship will ever entail less trouble than mine.

He was eager that I should break the entail, and he was of opinion that it lay in my power to do so.

When one's yacht is in the harbor below, it does not entail much danger.

It cannot, Sir Wycherly; nor with a will, so long as an heir of entail can be found.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-14c., "convert (an estate) into 'fee tail' (feudum talliatum)," from en- (1) "make" + taile "legal limitation," especially of inheritance, ruling who succeeds in ownership and preventing it from being sold off, from Anglo-French taile, Old French taillie, past participle of taillier "allot, cut to shape," from Late Latin taliare. Sense of "have consequences" is 1829, from notion of "inseparable connection." Related: Entailed; entailling.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ENTAIL

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.