dourness

[ door, douuhr, dou-er ]SEE DEFINITION OF dourness
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DOURNESS

Rob turned on her with all the dourness of the Anguses in him.

His face had an ugly, sullen look, something of his father's dourness.

Our Scottish kirk has a great reputation for dourness—but it has probably kindled more humour than it ever quenched.

Business is lively here, the chronic "dourness" of a market being discounted by the scarcity of horseflesh.

"You're as obstinate as the devil," smiled Peter, but in his heart he admired the dourness of his friend.

Stephen had apparently lost none of his dourness of the previous night.

There was a "dourness" about his character which would not permit him to bid for popularity.

There are days when I could do a hand-spring, if for nothing more than to shock my solemn old Dinky-Dunk out of his dourness.

All grim and grey, and waste, and dourness and dool; like the army as it returns frae the fecht.

Too intent upon her own feelings to give heed to the dourness of the lad Peggy followed him silently as he strode from the house.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-14c., "severe," from Scottish and northern England dialect, probably from Latin durus "hard" (see endure); sense of "gloomy, sullen" is late 15c.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DOURNESS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.