desertion

[ dih-zur-shuh n ]SEE DEFINITION OF desertion
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DESERTION

But, talk as he might, in Johnny Rosenfeld's loyal heart there was no thought of desertion.

Should she desert her father, and could that desertion be a virtue?

Be mine, and wholly mine—or never, never will I survive your desertion!

The greatest wrong you can inflict upon me will be inflicted by your desertion.

How many guesses have you made as to the cause of your desertion to-day?'

Mishap, desertion, and shipwreck pursued the luckless commander.

An almost intolerable sensation of desertion swept over her.

May I be eternally punished for the desertion in which I am forced to leave you!

For some time past she had been in despair about what she called Clotilde's desertion.

Desertion shall also be tried and punished in the same manner.

WORD ORIGIN

1590s, from Middle French désertion (early 15c.), from Late Latin desertionem (nominative desertio) "a forsaking, abandoning," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin deserere (see desert (v.)).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DESERTION

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.