deficit

[ def-uh-sit; British also dih-fis-it ]SEE DEFINITION OF deficit
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DEFICIT

Their credit for 1901 was $10392, thus leaving a deficit for the beginning of the next year.

But the addition or subtraction disclosed a deficit and he exclaimed at it.

But that due must be paid, not out of deficit, but out of surplus.

There will be a deficit in the accounts, just as the result of that.

He might perhaps have dispersed the Assembly; he could not disperse debt and deficit.

The deficit is worth a reference; it is for what they call a cool sum, Frank.

I'm no shark on the cost of livin' myself; but even I could figure out a deficit.

The year 1811 closed with a deficit of forty-eight millions.

His lordship has found out what you were at, and that there is a deficit in your till.

To this deficit has to be added some £150,000 for regular troops.

WORD ORIGIN

1782, from French déficit (late 17c.), from Latin deficit "it is wanting," an introductory word in clauses of inventory, third person singular present indicative of deficere "to be deficient" (see deficient).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DEFICIT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.