curate

[ noun kyoo r-it; verb kyoo-reyt, kyoo r-eyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF curate
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CURATE

He is a curate—a Welsh curate;—you are yet Mr. Beaufort, a rich and a great man.

A propos of the curate, I forgot to tell you that he is here.

Why did women treat him as though he were a curate and Vernon as though he were a god?

It was a priest, however, the curate of the parish, who now occupied the house.

They rested now upon the bride, now upon the bridegroom, now upon the faces of the rector and his curate.

The Major could only see four faces;--the faces of the bride and bridegroom, the rector, and his curate.

Get me the rector of the parish—a vicar, a curate, something of that sort.

The remainder of the conversation was confined for the most part to Frances and the curate.

The curate's ruffled feelings were evidently not soothed by this explanation.

One of the three was the sexton of the church, another was the curate, the third was a policeman.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "spiritual guide," from Medieval Latin curatus "one responsible for the care (of souls)," from Latin curatus, past participle of curare "to take care of" (see cure (v.)). Church of England sense of "paid deputy priest of a parish" first recorded 1550s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CURATE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.