cosmopolite

[ koz-mop-uh-lahyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF cosmopolite
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR COSMOPOLITE

As a cosmopolite, I claim this privilege, at least, though I can see defects in all.

No, sir, it is the remarkable gift of our people to be cosmopolite.

Then you get the real British flavor, which the cosmopolite Englishman loses.

Like Herodotus, he was cosmopolite enough not to be narrowly patriotic.

A complete man is intellectually and physically a cosmopolite.

I think he was a cosmopolite, and belonged to the world generally.

Where did this cosmopolite, who really has no English roots, learn the system?

Why is Stanford unable to set to music the word ‘cosmopolite’?

You are a cosmopolite, and look on these things with too refined a speculation.

Compared with him as a cosmopolite, the Wandering Jew would have seemed a mere hermit.

WORD ORIGIN

late 16c., "man of the world; citizen of the world," from Greek kosmopolites "citizen of the world," from kosmos "world" (see cosmos) + polites "citizen" (see politic). In common use 17c. in a neutral sense; it faded out in 18c. but was revived from c.1800 with a tinge of reproachfulness (opposed to patriot).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR COSMOPOLITE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.