Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CONCEIVED

Too well knowing his advantages: yet those not what she had conceived them to be!

Such conduct is as wicked and dangerous to the state as any that can be conceived.

For this is the way Shakespeare conceived jealousy and the only way.

I had not conceived that such accommodation could have been found in Dublin.

Then the pirates marched into the town, and what followed may be conceived.

Ere long he conceived the plan of publishing a newspaper of his own.

In a word, his despair was more easy to be conceived than related.

His situation was one of the most difficult and embarrassing which can be conceived of.

Kirkwood conceived a wholly senseless curiosity about the other wayfarer.

A flower, and a woman; both of them, as he conceived, lost to him for ever.

WORD ORIGIN

late 13c., conceiven, "take (seed) into the womb, become pregnant," from stem of Old French conceveir (Modern French concevoir), from Latin concipere (past participle conceptus) "to take in and hold; become pregnant," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + comb. form of capere "to take," from PIE *kap- "to grasp" (see capable). Meaning "take into the mind" is from mid-14c., a figurative sense also found in the Old French and Latin words. Related: Conceived; conceiving.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CONCEIVED

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.