commensurable

[ kuh-men-ser-uh-buh l, -sher-uh- ]SEE DEFINITION OF commensurable
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR COMMENSURABLE

But the motives to action are, like the physical forces, commensurable.

"Abstinence" and labor have pain as a common element, and so are commensurable.

In arithmetic he was the first to expound the theory of means and of proportion as applied to commensurable quantities.

In order that the punishments of different classes of crime may be proportional, the punishments should be commensurable.

He said he could not compare any sum of money with imprisonment—they were not commensurable quantities.

Commensurable, kom-en′sū-ra-bl, adj. having a common measure.

This is usually proved first for the commensurable case and then for the incommensurable one.

Not that crimes and jests are commensurable or approximable; but they are before the same judge.

Since the fraction is infinite it cannot be commensurable and therefore its value is a quadratic surd number.

These results were given by Lambert, and used by him to prove that π and π incommensurable, and also any commensurable power of e.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR COMMENSURABLE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.