claymore

[ kley-mawr, -mohr ]SEE DEFINITION OF claymore
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CLAYMORE

Nor less emphatic is his railing at the plaid and blaspheming at the claymore.

I thought the weather guaranteed me a season's rest, but here's the claymore again!

He then drew his claymore, and cut the cords which bound the intended victim.

Donald Roy leaped to his feet, waved his sword and shouted “Claymore!”

The former was laid dead on the ground by a stroke from a claymore.

“Perhaps you may be able to serve her,” remarked Lord Claymore.

No, my father could have drawn the claymore, but he could also use the ploughshare—and did.

It was an excellent weapon, better at close quarters than my claymore.

It was said that three thousand clansmen were ready to draw the claymore at his call.

“In my day, it was the house of Claymore,” Mrs. Grandale declared.

WORD ORIGIN

1749, "two-edged broadsword of ancient Scottish Highlanders," from Gaelic claidheamh mor "great sword," from claidheb "sword" (cf. Welsh cleddyf), possibly from PIE root *kel- "to strike" (see holt) + mor "great" (cf. Welsh mawr; see more). An antiquarian word made familiar again by Scott's novels; modern military application to pellet-scattering anti-personnel mine is first attested 1962.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CLAYMORE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.