cinnamon

[ sin-uh-muh n ]SEE DEFINITION OF cinnamon
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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CINNAMON

Stir in at the last a table-spoonful of mixed nutmeg and cinnamon.

Or you may send the sugar and cinnamon in a little glass bowl.

The store smelled of spice, and the clerk that minute spilled some cinnamon.

Put the mince into a quart of boiling milk, with a little butter and salt, cinnamon and sugar, and stir them carefully together.

Boil four ounces of ground rice in milk, with a blade of cinnamon: put it into a pot, and let it stand till the next day.

Boil a stick of cinnamon, a piece of lemon peel, and a little sugar, in three quarters of a pint of water for ten minutes.

Orange or quince marmalade is a great improvement; cinnamon pounded, or orange flower-water, will make an agreeable change.

The gills are notched, rather distant, pallid, then cinnamon; lachrymose.

A few whole cloves and a piece of cinnamon may be added if the flavor is liked.

A little claret, cinnamon, lemon juice and rind may also be added if liked.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., from Old French cinnamone (13c.), from Latin cinnamum, cinnamomum "cinnamon" (also used as a term of endearment), from Greek kinnamomon, from a Phoenician word akin to Hebrew qinnamon. Stripped from the bark of a tree in the avocado family. Ceylon cinnamon, the true cinnamon, is used in Britain, but American cinnamon is almost always from the related cassia tree of Southeast Asia and is stronger and sweeter.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CINNAMON

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.