Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BROUGHT DOWN

On November 13th, 1895, I was brought down here from London.

The detective, with great vehemence, brought down his fist on the table.

The irons were unlocked, and Francisco was brought down into the cabin.

Over one hundred fighting planes were brought down in flames.

And he showed the vial, which he had brought down in his enthusiasm.

It was twilight when the body was brought down from the upper room to the patio.

Her box had been brought down to the hall, and the porter, who wished to be friendly, was cording it.

Drake brought down his fist with a thump on to the mantelpiece.

Saying this with a snarl, he brought down his right hand with a thump on to the table.

But Bucks, as well as his experienced companion, had brought down an antelope.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English bringan "to bring, bring forth, produce, present, offer" (past tense brohte, past participle broht), from Proto-Germanic *brenganan (cf. Old Frisian brenga, Middle Dutch brenghen, Old High German bringan, Gothic briggan); no exact cognates outside Germanic, but it appears to be from PIE root *bhrengk-, compound based on root *bher- (1) "to carry" (cf. Latin ferre; see infer).

The tendency to conjugate this as a strong verb on the model of sing, drink, etc., is ancient: Old English also had a rare strong past participle form, brungen, corresponding to modern colloquial brung. To bring down the house figuratively (1754) is to elicit applause so thunderous it collapses the roof.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.