synonyms
  • definitions

bears out

[ bair ]SEE DEFINITION OF bears out

Synonyms for bears out

  • authenticate
  • confirm
  • corroborate
  • endorse
  • justify
  • prove
  • substantiate
  • support
  • uphold
  • validate
  • verify
  • vindicate
MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BEARS OUT

This is just what might be expected, and bears out the foregoing remarks.

"It only bears out what I said to you the other night," he observed.

The record at Fresno, for example, bears out this conclusion so far as it goes.

It bears out our observation of the affinity of the dust for metals.

"That bears out what you said," commented Maskull, turning rather pale.

Well, that bears out what Billy Sudden told me to-night after we were shot at.

This only bears out what has been already said about the Book of Geology.

"Which just bears out my own personal research in the field," he stated.

No, there was one more thing which I quote because it bears out Babemba's story.

When the boat comes down above them the men try to scare the bears out into the river.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English beran "to bear, bring; bring forth, produce; to endure, sustain; to wear" (class IV strong verb; past tense bær, past participle boren), from Proto-Germanic *beranan (cf. Old Saxon beran, Old Frisian bera, Old High German beran, German gebären, Old Norse bera, Gothic bairan "to carry, bear, give birth to"), from PIE root *bher- (1) meaning both "give birth" (though only English and German strongly retain this sense, and Russian has beremennaya "pregnant") and "carry a burden, bring" (see infer).

Ball bearings "bear" the friction. Many senses are from notion of "move onward by pressure." Old English past tense bær became Middle English bare; alternative bore began to appear c.1400, but bare remained the literary form till after 1600. Past participle distinction of borne for "carried" and born for "given birth" is from late 18c. To bear (something) in mind is from 1530s.