anemone

[ uh-nem-uh-nee ]SEE DEFINITION OF anemone

Synonyms for anemone

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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ANEMONE

Lulla, because of her anemone ways, is sometimes unkindly called "Huffs."

The Japanese anemone should be replanted only in the spring.

Drop one in the centre of an anemone and see how quickly it contracts.

Of course not; I should think I ought to know an anemone by now, sir!

The Anemone and Ranunculus are medium, or half-hardy, roots.

The locomotive power of the anemone, or actinia, is very sluggish.

Anemone Cottage was built partly of boulders taken from the shore.

Miss Martha was very proud of her dining-room at Anemone Cottage.

The lovely blue windflower (Anemone Apennina), is, I believe, one of these.

He was killed by a boar, and turned by Venus into an anemone.

WORD ORIGIN

flowering plant genus, 1550s, from Middle French anemone (16c.) and directly from Latin anemone, from Greek anemone "wind flower," literally "daughter of the wind," from anemos "wind" (cognate with Latin anima; see animus) + -one feminine patronymic suffix. According to Asa Gray, so called because it was thought to open only when the wind blows. Klein suggests the flower name perhaps originally is from Hebrew (cf. na'aman, in nit'e na'amanim, literally "plants of pleasantness," in Is. xvii:10, from na'em "was pleasant"). Applied to a type of sea creature (sea anemone) from 1773.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ANEMONE

polyp

noungrowth
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.