Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR AISLES

Saxon arches separating the nave from the aisles and chancel are plain.

But in the dimness of these two aisles lurks the spirit of the wilds.

Fair the long reaches of sun and shade in the aisles of the forest.

It is usually in three bays and opens into the aisles and central area.

Ladies in beautiful spring dresses were following the vergers up the aisles.

This is a building divided into a nave and aisles and with a vestibule.

Except in the choir all the aisles are of the same height, about 68 feet.

It is a small church, with nave and aisles of five bays and a square chancel.

Single Ionic columns also stand at the outer angles of the aisles.

It was so full that he could only stand in one of the aisles.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., ele, "lateral division of a church (usually separated by a row of pillars), from Old French ele "wing (of a bird or an army), side of a ship" (12c., Modern French aile), from Latin ala, related to axilla "wing, upper arm, armpit; wing of an army," from PIE *aks- "axis" (see axis), via a suffixed form *aks-la-. The root meaning in "turning" connects it with axle and axis.

Confused 15c. with unrelated ile "island" (perhaps from notion of a "detached" part of a church), and so it took an -s- when isle did, c.1700; by 1750 it had acquired an a-, on the model of French cognate aile. The word also was confused with alley, which gave it the sense of "passage between rows of pews or seats" (1731), which was thence extended to railway cars, theaters, etc.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.