Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ABROGATE

As not having imposed, she cannot abrogate, suspend, or modify them.

To abrogate one iota of his power was to abrogate the whole.

They make no laws, they consent to none, they abrogate none.

No one can invalidate his sentence; he can abrogate those of all others.

This is a common enough doctrine in Europe and a difficult one to abrogate.

Yet it does not appear that any legislator attempted to abrogate servitude.

He cannot abrogate a law both divine and natural, and I doubt——'

You were, as I have hinted, the first to abrogate its use in my favour.

It is now proposed to abrogate it on certain days and at certain places.

Again interpretative ordinances were called in to abrogate a portion of the law itself.

WORD ORIGIN

1520s, from Latin abrogatus, past participle of abrogare "to annul, repeal (a law)," from ab- "away" (see ab-) + rogare "propose a law, request" (see rogation). Form abrogen, from Old French abroger, is recorded from early 15c. Related: Abrogated; abrogating.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ABROGATE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.