Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR URCHIN

The urchin looked proudly up in his face, but made no reply.

"They've stopped to take a drink, you can go your money on it," said the urchin.

All at once the urchin came to a halt and planted himself in front of Henriette.

First Urchin (to Captain who has just bought a new motor-horn).

So ended the Urchin's first introduction to a university education.

A boy wanted to take his carpet bag, but he shook the urchin off.

On a ragged cot lay the urchin to whom Robby had given the biscuits.

An urchin who had frequently seen him before, stopped to gaze.

The urchin got a smart rap on the palm of his hand with the ruler.

“Fatterer than ever,” added an urchin, who in England would have been styled cheeky.

WORD ORIGIN

late 13c., yrichon "hedgehog," from Old North French *irechon (cf. Picard irechon, Walloon ireson, Hainaut hirchon), from Old French herichun "hedgehog" (Modern French hérisson), formed with diminutive suffix -on + Vulgar Latin *hericionem, from Latin ericius "hedgehog," from PIE root *gher- "to bristle" (cf. Greek kheros "hedgehog;" see horror).

Still used for "hedgehog" in non-standard speech in Cumbria, Yorkshire, Shropshire. Applied throughout 16c. to people whose appearance or behavior suggested hedgehogs, from hunchbacks (1520s) to goblins (1580s) to bad girls (c.1530); meaning "poorly or raggedly clothed youngster" emerged 1550s, but was not in frequent use until after c.1780. Sea urchin is recorded from 1590s (a 19c. Newfoundland name for them was whore's eggs).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR URCHIN

brat

nounspoiled child
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.