Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TIDE

Exhausted in mind and body, she could not long endure this tide of recollection.

Or, if I'd only got tied up in some way for a few weeks—something I could tide over.

But now came a tide of other news, and almost all of it was stale stuff to him.

There is one stream which I dread my inability to stem—it is the tide of Popular Opinion.

Again she found herself overwhelmed by a tide of reminiscences.

But soon the tide returns, and once more I hear the roistering of the waves.

There's a great roaring in the west, and it's worse it'll be getting when the tide's turned to the wind.

A tide of secret joy swept through him, as he realized his victory.

I tried to think, to struggle against the tide that was sweeping me away.

His troops were nearly all on the other side, when the tide began to rush in.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English tid "point or portion of time, due time," from Proto-Germanic *tidiz "division of time" (cf. Old Saxon tid, Dutch tijd, Old High German zit, German Zeit "time"), from PIE *di-ti- "division, division of time," suffixed form of root *da- "to divide, cut up" (cf. Sanskrit dati "cuts, divides;" Greek demos "people, land," perhaps literally "division of society;" daiesthai "to divide;" Old Irish dam "troop, company").

Meaning "rise and fall of the sea" (mid-14c.) is probably via notion of "fixed time," specifically "time of high water;" either a native evolution or from Middle Low German getide (cf. also Dutch tij, German Gezeiten "flood tide"). Old English seems to have had no specific word for this, using flod and ebba to refer to the rise and fall. Old English heahtid "high tide" meant "festival, high day."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TIDE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.