tartuffe

[ tahr-too f, -toof; French tar-tyf ]SEE DEFINITION OF tartuffe
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TARTUFFE

The soul of Tartuffe had entered into the body of a sinner of the last century.

The story of "Tartuffe" is briefly this: Tartuffe, the hero, is a pure villain.

Only tell him that I come from Mr. Tartuffe, for his benefit.

Madame Bordin interrupted him: "We know what a Tartuffe is."

She believed she saw in Mme. de Maintenon a Tartuffe in a sage-coloured gown.

Paris remembered that a former Bishop of Autun had been the original of Tartuffe.

Tartuffe at least knew what he was aiming at; but this fellow, for all his cleverness——'

The author of "The Hypocrite," the prototype of Tartuffe, was also the model.

Tartuffe and Jack the Ripper—was ever such a combination in the history of the world!

Molire is said to have had a personal aim in drawing the character of Tartuffe.

WORD ORIGIN

"pretender to piety," 1670s, from name of principal character in comedy by Molière (1664), apparently from Old French tartuffe "truffle," chosen for suggestion of concealment (Tartuffe is a religious hypocrite).

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.