tangerine

[ tan-juh-reen, tan-juh-reen ]SEE DEFINITION OF tangerine
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TANGERINE

Well, that taught my father a lesson, and after that he saved all his tangerine peels.

There was Tangerine Willy, who first met them carrying a bag of oranges.

The Mandarin or Tangerine orange has a thin rind which separates easily from the pulp, and is very sweet and rich.

This feat appears to be very difficult, but it is not; the weight of the tangerine helps you.

The most popular orange is the tangerine, or kid glove orange as it is sometimes called; many of these are exported.

Melt in a pan a lump of butter the size of a tangerine orange and squeeze on it the juice of half a lemon.

Keep orange, lemon, grape fruit or tangerine cups in cracked ice or ice water until just before serving, then drain and wipe dry.

When she had slowly sucked up that beverage, prodding the slice of tangerine with her straws, they went out and took a cab.

He waited, palpably waited, but Arlee continued to peel a tangerine with absorption, and the question had to come from him.

Very carefully she tore the tangerine skin into very little bits, her head bent over it.

WORD ORIGIN

1842, from tangerine orange (1841) "an orange from Tangier," seaport in northern Morocco, from which it was originally imported to Britain. The place name is from Latin Tinge. As a color name, attested from 1899.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TANGERINE

orange

nouncombination of red and yellow
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.