Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR STONELIKE

It was wholly impossible for them to crush the stonelike casing with their bills.

Not the movement of a finger broke the stonelike immobility of his attitude.

Mary bent her head on her hands in strange, stonelike rigidity.

I groped along until my outstretched fingers came across the corner of a building, rough, stonelike—the concrete garage and study.

How is it that a bone in its stonelike hardness is essentially the same as the exquisitely sensitive eye?

How is it that a bone in its stonelike hardness is essentially the same as the infinitely tender tissues of the eye?

She winced almost as if he had struck her; and then the parted lips closed, her whole face assumed a stonelike dignity.

Claire René would watch the flamelight spread over the stonelike face.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English stan, used of common rocks, precious gems, concretions in the body, memorial stones, from Proto-Germanic *stainaz (cf. Old Norse steinn, Danish steen, Old High German and German stein, Gothic stains), from PIE *stai- "stone," also "to thicken, stiffen" (cf. Sanskrit styayate "curdles, becomes hard;" Avestan stay- "heap;" Greek stear "fat, tallow," stia, stion "pebble;" Old Church Slavonic stena "wall").

Slang sense of "testicle" is from mid-12c. The British measure of weight (usually equal to 14 pounds) is from late 14c., originally a specific stone. Stone's throw for "a short distance" is attested from 1580s. Stone Age is from 1864. To kill two birds with one stone is first attested 1650s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR STONELIKE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.