stirrup

[ stur-uh p, stir-, stuhr- ]SEE DEFINITION OF stirrup
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR STIRRUP

Halfway up the stretch Allis was riding stirrup to stirrup with her father.

The horse was saddled and bridled; the groom held the stirrup, and up I got.

He picked up the bridle-reins, caught the saddle-horn, and thrust his toe into the stirrup.

"I'll hold on to you; and you must hold on to the stirrup and to the horse's mane," she said.

He led her to her horse and held the stirrup for her as she swung to the saddle.

He let his foot down into the stirrup again and they all smiled broadly.

She saw Garnache raise his foot to the stirrup and hoist himself to the saddle.

Fletcher paused, one foot in the stirrup, and looked the fellow up and down.

With his foot in the stirrup he made the cord taut and set the shaft in position.

His foot was in the stirrup when a quick rush sounded behind him.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English stigrap, literally "climbing rope," from stige "a climbing, ascent" (from Proto-Germanic *stigaz "climbing;" see stair) + rap (see rope). Originally a looped rope as a help for mounting. Germanic cognates include Old Norse stigreip, Old High German stegareif, German stegreif. Surgical device used in childbirth, etc., so called from 1884. Stirrup-cup (1680s) was a cup of wine or other drink handed to a man already on horseback and setting out on a journey, hence "a parting glass" (cf. French le vin de l'etrier).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR STIRRUP

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.