Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR STEMMING

And she, stemming her fears once more, ran to do his bidding.

At last he was stemming the strong tide-rip off Brimstone Point.

After the bristles are ready, the next thing is to make the stemming.

He went to the window and leaned out, stemming his hands on the sill.

I left them stemming the gulf stream with a beautiful breeze.

I tried to incline him to the calmer paths of life; but it was stemming a torrent.

You can now stop either by stemming alone or by stemming and turning.

The term “stemming” may be used in several different senses.

Her progress was slow, for she was now stemming the current.

There was no stopping or stemming the sweep of the men of Munster.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English stemn, stefn "stem of a plant," also "either end-post of a ship," from Proto-Germanic *stamniz (cf. Old Saxon stamm, Old Norse stafn "stem of a ship;" Danish stamme, Swedish stam "trunk of a tree;" Old High German stam, German Stamm), from PIE root *sta- "to stand" (see stet).

Meaning "support of a wineglass" is from 1835. Stem-winding watches (1875) were advanced and desirable when introduced, hence slang stem-winder "excellent thing" (1892). The nautical sense is preserved in the phrase stem to stern "along the full length" (of a ship), attested from 1620s. The verbal phrase stems from, first recorded 1932, American English, translates German stammen aus, probably from a figurative sense represented by English stem (n.) in the sense of "stock of a family, line of descent" (c.1540; cf. family tree, and German stammvater "tribal ancestor," literally "stem-father"). Stem cell attested by 1885.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR STEMMING

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.