Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR STEEPED

But I left you eating lotus, hollow-eyed and steeped in dreams.

He was hardened, steeped in guilt, and callous as to the sufferings of others.

The ginger must be steeped over-night, that you may be able to cut it.

The shower of roses around and on her steeped her in pinkness.

In proportion to the time they are steeped in the liquor, ivory or bones will be capable of receiving any new impression.

In the winter the seeds should be steeped in warm water, and the bag put in a place sufficiently hot to make them sprout.

An ounce and a half of peruvian bark bruised, and an ounce of orange peel, steeped in a pint of the best brandy, for ten days.

You had best stand aside—you that are steeped in musk and fierceness.

He asked for Illowski, but she did not reply; she, too, was steeped in dreams.

Peter was imaginative, for he had been steeped from boyhood in the superstitions of his people.

WORD ORIGIN

"having a sharp slope," Old English steap "high, lofty," from Proto-Germanic *staupaz (cf. Old Frisian stap, Middle High German *stouf), from PIE *steup- "to push, stick, knock, beat," with derivations referring to projecting objects (cf. Greek typtein "to strike," typos "a blow, mold, die;" Sanskrit tup- "harm," tundate "pushes, stabs;" Gothic stautan "push;" Old Norse stuttr "short"). The sense of "precipitous" is from c.1200. The slang sense "at a high price" is a U.S. coinage first attested 1856. Related: Steeply; steepness.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR STEEPED

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.