sonorousness

[ suh-nawr-uhs, -nohr-, son-er-uhs ]SEE DEFINITION OF sonorousness
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SONOROUSNESS

All its tones must be of equal power, sonorousness and beauty.

All these additions are, however, prejudicial to the sonorousness of bells, and of very doubtful utility.

A few cornet--pistons, for which its lightness and sonorousness admirably adapt it, have actually been made of it.

When heard near by, the sonorousness of the sound reminds one of the cello.

Homer and Rannjana often allude to the sonorousness of the bow and its string.

The ladies praised his voice and the music, but were more struck with the softness and sonorousness of the Russian language.

However, the sonorousness is sometimes striking and the grip of the phrases complete at its best.

At all events, the substance of which this violin is made is not likely to contribute to the sonorousness.

Rapid refrigeration increases the sonorousness of all these alloys.

They merely serve as sympathetic strings, to increase the sonorousness when the catgut-strings are played upon with the bow.

WORD ORIGIN

1610s, from Latin sonorus "resounding," from sonor "sound, noise," from sonare "to sound" (see sonata). Related: Sonorously; sonorousness. Earlier was sonouse (c.1500), from Medieval Latin sonosus; sonourse "having a pleasing voice" (c.1400), from sonor + -y (2).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SONOROUSNESS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.